Covocational Ministry

Every believer is a minister.

In this documentary, some members share how and why they are involved in ministry, and how it’s possible to live life on mission in the context of a church family that’s doing life together.

What is Covocational Ministry?

The Harvest is Plentiful, But the Workers are Few

When we look at our world today, what we see is a dearth of Christian workers against a backdrop of great spiritual need.

Our nation is becoming less and less Christian, with Gen Z being described as the largest and least-Christian "unreached people group" in our history.

We share in this burden, as we see people all around us in need of the message of God’s forgiveness and love.

Meanwhile, many Christian leaders bemoan the phenomenon of spectator Christianity: in many churches, a small percentage of paid staff bear a disproportionate amount of the ministry load, while many congregants rarely, if ever, experience a deeper level of involvement with the Great Commission. Jesus’ statement, “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few” remains as true as ever.

But where will these workers come from?

When we look at our world today, what we see is a dearth of Christian workers against a backdrop of great spiritual need.

Our nation is becoming less and less Christian, with Gen Z being described as the largest and least-Christian "unreached people group" in our history.

We share in this burden, as we see people all around us in need of the message of God’s forgiveness and love.

Meanwhile, many Christian leaders bemoan the phenomenon of spectator Christianity: in many churches, a small percentage of paid staff bear a disproportionate amount of the ministry load, while many congregants rarely, if ever, experience a deeper level of involvement with the Great Commission. Jesus’ statement, “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few” remains as true as ever.

But where will these workers come from?

Every Believer is Called Into Ministry

We believe that the answer to the need of the harvest field is you and me.

Scripture teaches us that the entire purpose of church leadership is not merely to serve the needs of its members, but to equip each of its members for the work of ministry! [1]

That’s why we structure our ministry in a way that equips and deploys every member for a life of active ministry.

Because the labor required to "put on church" is not enough to fully deploy our members, most of our kingdom laborers are out in the field, not inside the church. Over time we have gradually become less like a traditional church and more like a band of kingdom workers engaged in full-on ministry outside the church walls.

We believe that the answer to the need of the harvest field is you and me.

Scripture teaches us that the entire purpose of church leadership is not merely to serve the needs of its members, but to equip each of its members for the work of ministry! [1]

That’s why we structure our ministry in a way that equips and deploys every member for a life of active ministry.

Because the labor required to "put on church" is not enough to fully deploy our members, most of our kingdom laborers are out in the field, not inside the church. Over time we have gradually become less like a traditional church and more like a band of kingdom workers engaged in full-on ministry outside the church walls.

[1] Ephesians 4:6-7

[1] Ephesians 4:6-7

Challenges of Doing Covocational Ministry

As thrilling and meaningful as it is, covocational ministry isn’t easy. In addition to the inherent challenges that come with evangelism, discipleship, and church life, our covocational ministers also have work and family obligations to take care of.

We also aren’t immune to the ups and downs of life. We have members who have children with special needs; those whose parents are terminally ill; members struggling with mental health issues; members grappling with loss and trauma; or those undergoing taxing medical treatments. After all this, how do we have time and strength for ministry?

Alone, it might be all but impossible. But what about when we do it together?

As thrilling and meaningful as it is, covocational ministry isn’t easy. In addition to the inherent challenges that come with evangelism, discipleship, and church life, our covocational ministers also have work and family obligations to take care of.

We also aren’t immune to the ups and downs of life. We have members who have children with special needs; those whose parents are terminally ill; members struggling with mental health issues; members grappling with loss and trauma; or those undergoing taxing medical treatments. After all this, how do we have time and strength for ministry?

Alone, it might be all but impossible. But what about when we do it together?

Co-laboring Together in Covenantal Community

We’ve discovered that the answer to sustaining ministry through life’s challenges is found in following the biblical model for Christian community. Wanting to strive together for the gospel [1], to bear each other's burdens [2], to meet together every day [3], to contribute to each other's needs [4], and to encourage one another regularly [5], we've tried to adopt the patterns of the early church that we find in Acts 2:42-47.

We’ve discovered that the answer to sustaining ministry through life’s challenges is found in following the biblical model for Christian community. Wanting to strive together for the gospel [1], to bear each other's burdens [2], to meet together every day [3], to contribute to each other's needs [4], and to encourage one another regularly [5], we've tried to adopt the patterns of the early church that we find in Acts 2:42-47.

By following this portrait of high unity and high surrender for the common good, we’ve found that covocational ministry is not only sustainable, but doable in a full and energizing way. So how does this all net out? For the covocational ministers in our church, it comes down to our shared commitment to a common body of values, or our Way of Life.

By following this portrait of high unity and high surrender for the common good, we’ve found that covocational ministry is not only sustainable, but doable in a full and energizing way. So how does this all net out? For the covocational ministers in our church, it comes down to our shared commitment to a common body of values, or our Way of Life.

[1] Philippians 1:27 [2] Galatians 6:2 [3] Hebrews 10:24-25 [4] Romans 12:13 [5] 1 Thessalonians 5:11

[1] Philippians 1:27 [2] Galatians 6:2 [3] Hebrews 10:24-25 [4] Romans 12:13 [5] 1 Thessalonians 5:11

© 2023 Acts2 Network. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.

© 2023 Acts2 Network. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.

© 2023 Acts2 Network. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.